What Does Every Litigation War Room Need to be Successful?

This is the PowerPoint from the presentation I gave to Dallas Area Paralegal Association on September 12, 2011.

What Does Every Litigation War Room Need to be Successful?

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Real World Lessons, special guest post by Janabeth F. Taylor, R.N., R.N.C./Litigation Paralegal

REAL WORLD LESSONS
by
Janabeth F. Taylor, R.N., R.N.C./Litigation Paralegal

“We cannot direct the wind, but we can adjust our sails.”
-Unknown

The beauty of the law is that it is dynamic—it changes as society changes. The law adapts to technological developments, to shifts in social values, and to the problems of modern society. The key to succeeding in this dynamic legal environment is that we, too, must learn to adapt—to adjust our sails.

As I write this, I think of my fellow paralegals. I cannot help but see myself nineteen years ago, as a new graduate of the University of Oklahoma Law Center- Legal Assistant Division program. This program was very rigorous, and a highly regarded program. as well as one of the few in the Nation then accredited by the American Bar Association.
Back in 1992, I was working part-time in a law office while teaching nursing full time, with a few weekends of hospital work thrown in the mix to keep in touch with the “real world of clinical nursing.” The rest of my “free time” was spent with studying and attending classes at the University of Oklahoma Law Center.

In anticipation of graduation, I sent resumes to several law firms looking for the perfect place to begin my new career.

One firm stood out in my job search. This firm was over 100 years old, and had attorneys with very different backgrounds and experiences. I was fortunate to be hired by this firm. Although I did not realize it at the time, working for this firm would be a life-changing and career developing experience for me.

I worked with five different attorneys, each with his own style and personality. Very early

I learned that part of my job was to adapt to their differing approaches and preferences. I was often “adjusting my sails” to accommodate them.

I was asked to work in areas of law that were unfamiliar to me. I had to learn to listen, to ask questions, to think creatively, to accept criticism, and to adjust my sails.

Some of the most important lessons I learned were not ones from a textbook. Among these “realworld” lessons were:

  • Most law offices are not like the ones depicted on shows like Boston Legal, Harry’s Law, or Ally McBeal. And most attorneys are not going to look or act like William Shatner, Kathy Bates, or Calista Flockhart.
  • Do not assume; always verify the facts.
  • Pay attention to detail. No one ever lost a case by knowing the facts too well.
  • Never give an attorney an original or your only copy of a document.
  • Develop your own daily reminder system. This way tasks and deadlines don’t fall through the cracks, and also serves as a backup to the general calendar system of your firm.
  • Abide by a stringent, ethical code in your practice as a paralegal. Never give legal advice. Do not hold yourself out or in any way give the impression you are a lawyer.
  • Develop relationships with court personnel – treat them all with respect.
  • If you don’t know the answer, know the resources you can use to find it. Knowing the
    resource is half the battle. The other half is admitting you don’t know the answer and
    identifying the question (s) to ask in order to utilize the resources you have available.
  • If you make a mistake, admit it immediately. One can only correct a mistake if it is admitted to, recognized, and addressed. It may be hard to admit to a mistake, but early admission may make the critical difference in being able to rectify the error.
  • Don’t be too quick to take “no” for an answer. Good paralegals always look for a way to
    work it out or get around an issue when someone initially says “no.”
  • Proofread all work. One mistake can compromise your case. Even though I didn’t like it, I learned this lesson—sometimes the hard way—but I learned it.
  • Respect your attorney and the client by meeting or exceeding deadlines. No one has ever been fired for finishing a project early.
  • Conference frequently with your supervising attorney. Provide the attorney with a list of questions and topics for discussion prior to each meeting.
  • Always repeat back instructions as given to you when receiving an assignment. This way you can confirm you heard what the other person thought they were saying.
  • Networking is invaluable. You can never know too many smart people.
  • Treat legal secretaries and all support personnel in the office as equals. You will find that they know more about many things than you do and are valuable resources.
  • Listen and learn. Everyone has something to offer. You can learn from the most experienced of veterans and the most inexperienced “greenhorns.” Great ideas sometimes come from the most unexpected sources.
  • Keep up with new court rules, changes in the law, and changes in technology. With each
    passing year, computer technology plays a larger role in the practice of law.
  • Document, document, document…each task completed, each client communication, each conference with an attorney, and all deadlines.
  • Do not participate in office gossip; in the end it serves no purpose and is a distraction from your assigned tasks.
  • Regardless how adversarial your supervising attorneys are, it is important for the paralegal to be courteous, personable, and professional when dealing with court staff, witnesses, and opposing counsel
  • Do not lose sight of who you are really working for: the client. You may have twenty files on your desk, but to each client, his file is the only one that is important to him.
  • Join and participate in local, state and national professional organizations, and take
    advantage of continuing education programs offered to their members. Through these
    activities you can exchange ideas, learn new resources, and develop a valuable network of peers.

The most important lesson I have learned is that success can only be achieved on your terms. Everyone has his or her own idea of what a successful career is. Ultimately, true success is how each of us chooses to define it.

When I left a 10-year career in nursing education to work for attorneys, my nursing colleagues thought I was crazy. When I changed careers again to be an independent paralegal/ medical legal consultant, there were those who said I was crazy to leave the comforts and employee benefits provided when working for “the firm.” But I am not crazy. I am happy. I am successful on my own terms.

Don’t let someone else decide what your success should be. If your success is not on your own terms—if it looks good to the world but does not feel good in your heart—it is not success at all.

Regardless of what original motivation steered us into this profession, most paralegals would agree we are heavily encouraged by our adversarial system’s motivation to win, win…win!

Without a doubt, assisting your attorney win for his or her client is a strong benchmark for the measurement of success.

However…I prefer to think the true measure of a successful paralegal-attorney-client relationship is that of service. That would encompass service to the client and service to the client’s best interest, regardless of whether you can record a “win”

The wind changed many times in my life and each time I adjusted my sails. My career has been an incredible journey. Never in my wildest dreams would I have imagined in 1992 that I would be writing nineteen years later, addressing my peers, and telling of my experiences and life lessons.

Each class, each job, each life experience along my journey was a foundation for my next step. I encourage you to learn from each case you assist with. Learn from each attorney you work with. Let each of these lessons be a foundation for your next experience.

And, most importantly, when the wind changes adjust your sails. An incredible journey awaits you.

Janabeth F. Taylor, R.N., R.N.C. has a degree in Nursing from Oklahoma State University and Litigation Paralegal Certificate from the University of Oklahoma Law Center. She was a nursing instructor for ten years and has been a medical legal consultant since 1990. Ms. Taylor is currently President/Ow ner of Attorney’s Medical Services, Inc. in Corpus Christi, TX. In 2002 she was named the Association of Trial Lawyers of America’s (AJJ) Paralegal of the Year. She provide s litigation support for attorneys across the United States and specializes in case reviews and Internet inform ation resources.

 Her website is: http://www.attorneysmedicalservices.com
and her e-mail address is: jana@attorneysmedicalservices.com

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Digital War Room Pro Desktop – Video Demonstration

 Video showing e-Discovery and how Digital War Room Pro Desktop works. This is a good overview that shows you what it looks like and how easy it is to use:

DWR Pro Desktop eDiscovery.wmvdocumenttechnology-news.come-discovery, document processing, EDRM, ESI, legal document review, legal discovery, FRCP

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From Senior Litigation Paralegal to…The Dark Side (Vendor)

Senior Litigation Paralegal

Senior Litigation Paralegal

VENDOR…

Vendor

Someone asked me why I chose to move from being a Senior Litigation Paralegal managing complex litigation cases to the dark side by becomming a “vendor” of litigation support services.

At times, it did seem like some vendors might put me in a mind vice using Jedi mind tricks. In reality, there are basically two types of litigation support professionals. The first are sales people through and through. The thrill of the chase and the money involved drives them. They too often take on the aura of the dark side with fake smiles and gimicky promotions. I’m not saying stress balls and cookies are bad, there just has to be some substance behind that Snickerdoodle in order for me to take notice after 20 plus years in litigation.

The second type of litigation support professional is more like a teacher or educator. These professionals use their years of experience to help others combat successfully in the ever changing minefield of litigation. The poster children for these types of professionals are Bob Sweat and Tom Miller at Open Door Solutions, LLP. On a larger scale, companies like Digital WarRoom, by GGO also fit that bill. That is one of the reasons Litigation Paralegals, LLC partnered with Digital WarRoom, but more on that later.

In growing Litigation Paralegals, we seek to emulate what the teachers and educators in the field have done by utilizing my 20 plus years in law firms as a common ground for helping client law firms, companies and governmental agencies obtain first rate service on-demand, while holding down the costs associated with litigation.

Technology and Legal Project Management play a big role in servicing clients and in reducing costs. Contrary to popular opinion, technology does not have to be expensive and eDiscovery is not as scary as everyone thinks.

 This blog will cover such topics as the effective use of technology and legal project management to drive litigation cases instead of having them drive you. We will be testing products that are cool and sharing our experience with how well they deliver on the stated promise. We will propose methodologies and best practices to make your working life more enjoyable.

We will also be covering mobility and the trials and tribulations associated with operating a fully functional Mobile War Room…yes, a War Room on wheels.

So, sit back. Fasten your seat belt (there are eight of them) and enjoy the ride from an office that has some of the most spectacular views.

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LTN: Law Technology News article by Tom O’Connor quotes Keith Slyter

When You Don’t Need an Army: EDD for Everyday Lawsuits

http://www.law.com/jsp/lawtechnologynews/PubArticleLTN.jsp?id=1202508605023#

Keith Slyter, principal of Litigation Paralegals in Dallas is a believer in Digital War Room to do both processing and hosting: “I would opt to implement Digital War Room Remote or the Server Version. This Ernie Challenge is almost exactly the situation I am encountering in my Mobile Litigation Command Center (Mobile War Room) with small to midsize firms. The traditional options were not working, but Digital War Room is the best option out there for this situation. I use a self-standing network attached storage with 2 TB storage to house the data and clients can access the information a couple of different ways.”

“It does everything soup to nuts and is pretty easy to set up. In fact, my first install took 50 minutes start to finish, including running a full production of 1,100 images. Native files were Microsoft Word, PST, and PDF. Everything was converted to TIFF, OCR, and Bates stamped. Load files were generated for Concordance and Summation. The most difficult and time-consuming part was loading SQL Server Express on a laptop to get everything to run correctly,” he says. “This is the best usable solution I have found for small to medium firms who have some tech experience or who want to hire me to implement and train them on the best practices for their product.”

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Digital WarRoom Arms Litigation Paralegals’ E-Discovery Arsenal

http://www.law.com/jsp/lawtechnologynews/PubArticleFriendlyLTN.jsp?id=1202499685530&slreturn=1&hbxlogin=1

Michael Roach

Law Technology News

07-08-2011

Litigation Paralegals, a Dallas-based litigation support service provider, has seized an opportunity to expand their e-discovery arsenal by adding Gallivan Gallivan & O’Melia’s Digital WarRoom E-Discovery platform to their list of services. The regional service provider of forensics, litigation support, and document management services is the first to jump on board DWR’s preferred partners program, which promises more affordable e-discovery to providers through access to company tools and team.

“I’m excited to work with the Digital WarRoom team,” says Litigation Paralegals founder Keith Slyter. “Digital WarRoom Pro and Digital WarRoom WorkGroup will be a key part of our e-discovery offering. Digital WarRoom products eliminate the lead time and cost related to pre-processing. My team can process ESI directly within the Digital WarRoom tool, allowing clients to start reviewing documents within a few hours.”

DWR manufactures DWR Pro, DWR Workgroup, DWR Remote, and DWR Server products. The DWR platform supports fast and efficient ESI processing, content analysis and data analytics (aka early-case assessment), review, tagging, and production of e-mail and documents for litigation, government investigations, M&As, and other legal issues.

DWR Pro is a PC-based application geared toward small matters — “up to 10 custodians or 500,000 documents,” according to the company website. DWR Workgroup delivers collaborative, network accessible e-discovery. Among its benefits are the elimination of volume-based processing fees, and portable matters: “A case database, along with work product, can move easily from DWR WorkGroup to DWR Pro desktop or into DWR Remote; or from inside to outside counsel,” the company says.

Press release.

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Digital WarRoom Expands E-Discovery Services with Dallas-based Litigation Paralegals LLC

http://www.prweb.com/releases/2011/6/prweb8609216.htm

Partnership with Litigation Paralegals Provides Complete On-Demand Litigation Support Services, E-Discovery Processing and Review

Quote start” Our goal at Litigation Paralegals is to provide first-rate service on-demand, while holding down the cost to our clients. Digital WarRoom eliminates the lead time and cost of pre-processing.” Keith SlyterQuote end

Seattle, Washington (PRWEB) June 29, 2011

Gallivan Gallivan & O’Melia, creators of the Digital WarRoom™ platform for accessible, affordable e-discovery, announced today a new partnership with Litigation Paralegals LLC, an innovative provider of Paralegal and Litigation support services. The partnership is first in a recently established e-discovery partners program to expand the availability of Digital WarRoom through outstanding regional service providers of forensics, litigation support, and document management services.

The Digital WarRoom mission is to make e-discovery accessible and affordable for all matters, and for all legal professionals, whether in large or small law firms or on corporate legal teams. The Digital WarRoom E-Discovery platform is a robust e-discovery architecture designed to support fast and efficient ESI processing, content analysis and early case assessment, review, marking and production of email and documents in response to litigation, investigations, M&A activity, and other legal challenges.

Litigation Paralegals LLC was founded by Keith Slyter, a senior litigation paralegal with extensive experience proactively managing high-profile complex commercial litigation, labor and employment litigation and patent litigation cases, to provide litigation paralegal assistance to law firms, in-house legal departments and governmental agencies. Litigation Paralegals LLC provides services and project management in case initiation, investigations, and motion practice, as well as discovery and trial support. A distinctive advantage that Litigation Paralegals provides to their clients is on-demand service from a ‘Mobile Command Center’ that can be brought onsite at a client’s office, or outside the courtroom door during trial, complete with networked technology, internet access, printing and scanning services – a War Room on wheels.

“I’m excited to work with the Digital WarRoom team,” said Keith Slyter. “Our goal at Litigation Paralegals is to provide first-rate service on-demand, while holding down the cost to our clients. Digital WarRoom Pro and Digital WarRoom WorkGroup will be a key part of our e-discovery offering. Digital WarRoom products eliminate the lead time and cost related to pre-processing. My team can process ESI directly within the Digital WarRoom tool, allowing clients to start reviewing documents within a few hours. With Litigation Paralegals and Digital WarRoom, law firms gain a time and a huge cost advantage in conducting early data assessment, developing case strategy, and delivering responsive documents.”

“Litigation Paralegals is a very strong service provider, and we are pleased they have chosen to standardize on Digital WarRoom,” said Bill Gallivan, CEO and founder of Gallivan Gallivan and O’Melia. “Our mission is to make powerful, professional e-discovery accessible and affordable for all matters, regardless of size or complexity. Keith and his team share that vision, and we are proud to have Litigation Paralegals onboard for the benefit of our mutual clients.” For more information about Litigation Paralegals, visit http://www.litigationparalegals.net , or call Keith Slyter at 214.263.1463.

For more information on the Digital WarRoom preferred partners program, visit http://www.digitalwarroom.com/company/partners/ , or email partners(at)digitalwarroom(dot)com

About GGO
Since its inception in 2002, GGO (Gallivan Gallivan & O’Melia LLC) has successfully completed over 2,000 complex e-discovery matters, including over 250 matters since 2009 for which the company processed and hosted 1,300 terabytes of electronic documents. The Digital WarRoom® Platform is a robust e-discovery architecture designed to support fast and efficient ESI processing, content analysis and early case assessment, review, marking and production of email and documents in response to litigation, investigations, M&A activity, and other legal challenges.

Customized services include M&A target data preservation and internal data mining and investigations. Headquartered in Seattle, GGO offices are located in New York, Mountain View, San Francisco, Dallas, and Los Angeles, serving all metropolitan markets in North America. Leading global corporations, Fortune 1000 companies, Am Law 100 law firms, and government agencies, including the Library of Congress, rely on GGO for robust technology and personalized service. To learn more about GGO, visit http://www.digitalwarroom.com

# # #

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Litigation Paralegal, LLC Applauds Digital WarRoom Pro

 http://ridethelightning.senseient.com/2011/05/litigation-paralegal-llc-applauds-digital-warroom-pro.html

Keith Slyter of Litigation Paralegals, LLC wrote me recently, strongly endorsing Digital WarRoom Pro as having met the Ernie Challenge that e-discovery expert Tom O’Conner recently propounded. It was a fascinating note which he revised in the light of my many questions (thanks Keith). Here it is for your perusal – I’d like to hear about larger data sets or problems that anyone else may have experienced – obviously Keith is a big fan based on what he has seen thus far. Here’s his note:

Megan Miller with Digital War Room turned me onto your blog and site. After reading through your site, Craig Ball’s site and then the Ernie Challenge, http://theerniechallenge.wordpress.com/2011/04/04/to-edna-and-beyond-the-ernie-challenge/ I felt compelled to write a response and tout Digital War Room as a realistic solution for small to mid-sized law firms and cases. At a price point of $895 for a single user and ~$4,000 for a multi-user solution, it is something I can recommend to clients with a straight face.

They are already stunned and amazed when I pull up in a 43 foot Mobile Litigation Command Center, so I don’t want their eyes to glaze over by proposing they pay me $50,000 to “process” their native client documents before they can even start reviewing them.

Having tested Digital War Room Pro, http://www.digitalwarroom.com/, I would opt to implement Digital War Room Remote or the Server Version for multiple users and reviewers in different locations.

This is almost exactly the situation I am encountering in my Mobile Litigation Command Center (Mobile War Room) with small to medium sized firms. The traditional options were not working, but Digital War Room is the best option out there for this situation. I use a self-standing NAS with 2TB storage to house the data and clients can access the information a couple of different ways.

It does everything soup to nuts and is pretty easy to set up. In fact, my first install took 50 minutes start to finish, including running a full production of 1100 TIFF images and associated OCR files. The native files were in Word, .pst and .pdf. Everything was converted from the native to TIFF image, OCR and Bates stamped after performing a deNist process, although there were only 2 duplicates in the production. Load files were generated for Concordance and Summation. The most difficult and time consuming part was loading SQL Server Express on a laptop to get everything to run correctly.

Email attachments kept the parent/child relationship and the TIFF image production kept the attachments in order after the emails after the conversion was complete.

Having used Law PreDiscovery in the past, Digital War Room was quite impressive and is a seamless one stop solution. I did not need to use any other program to review, tag, mark privilege or to convert and produce in a TIFF/OCR format as was agreed upon during the 26(f) conference.

This is the best usable solution I have found for small to medium firms who have some tech experience or who want to hire me to implement and train them on the best practices for using this product and making sense out of their review of native documents and production of those documents in whatever format they have agreed upon with the other side.

One important note is that this was a very small collection of documents to be reviewed and produced. I am going to test on a larger data set before I start recommending this to larger firms or for larger case, but from what I see so far GGO may have actually nailed it and cracked the per GB nut as they tout. We shall see after I do a start to finish on a more complex matter, but I am excited about the possibilities and cost savings to my clients.

The other thing I need to test is taking an existing Concordance or Summation dataset and converting/loading/dumping it into Digital War Room to see if this will be my ongoing solution for small to medium firms on all their small to medium cases. One downfall may be that the folder structure for cases is only 2 or 3 folders deep. Probably not too much of a concern for small to medium sized cases, but for complex cases with multiple productions from multiple sources it could present a challenge for quickly finding a production, but maybe only if you have 100’s of folders going at one time and the naming nomenclature is not understood.

I am still working on how best to use this during trial with Trial Director and Sanction, but I think we have figured that out as well. I just need a trial to test it in.

Anyway, well done on your blog and website. Great information.

Keith Slyter
214.263.1463 (Direct)
kslyter@litigationparalegals.net

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To Edna and Beyond: The Ernie Challenge

http://theerniechallenge.wordpress.com/2011/04/04/to-edna-and-beyond-the-ernie-challenge/

Keith Slyter says:

 Having tested Digital War Room Pro, http://www.digitalwarroom.com/, I would opt to implement Digital War Room Remote or the Server Version.

This is almost exaclty the situation I am encountering in my Mobile Litigation Command Center (Mobile War Room) with small to medium sized firms. The traditional options were not working, but Digital War Room is the best option out there for this situation. I use a self standing NAS with 2TB storage to house the data and clients can access the information a couple of different ways.

It does everything soup to nuts and is pretty easy to set up. In fact, my first install took 50 minutes start to finish, including running a full production of 1100 images. Native files were Word, pst and pdf. Everything was converted to TIFF, OCR and Bates stamped. Load files were generated for Concordance and Summation. The most difficult and time consuming part was loading SQL Server Express on a laptop to get everything to run correctly.

This is the best usable solution I have found for small to medium firms who have some tech experience or who want to hire me to implement and train them on the best practices for their product.

I am still working on how best to use this during trial with Trial Director and Sanction, but I think we have figured that out as well. I just need a trial to test it in.

 

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Successful on Purpose: Keith Slyter and His Mobile War Room Command Center

Cover.Know March 2011

 Hard work is not new to Keith Slyter, a litigation paralegal living in Dallas, Texas. A native of Minnesota, Slyter grew up on a dairy farm in a small town called Rose Creek, somewhere near the Mayo Clinic. If it weren’t for the bitter winters and exhausting cold weather, he may still be there today.
     Sylter’s childhood sounds like something right out of the idyllic American dream. This 43 year-old, easy-going guy with good core family values learned first-hand that if you want to reach your goals, you’re going to have to depend on yourself.
     Moving to Texas and becoming a paralegal, Sylter moved through the usual litigation paralegal jobs until last year, he struck out on his own to open the first Mobile Paralegal Services business.  An interesting and useful concept that I expect will turn out wildly successful.
    As Slyter sought avenues to expand his career, a plan began to take shape.  ”What if I started a business for small and midsize firms to offer the services of a full-time paralegal without having to pay for a full-time paralegal?” says Slyter. 
      ”As the plan developed, I came across a common problem of smaller firms:  Where do you physically put the employees and how do you put them on the network? What if you had a mobile litigation command war room at trial? This could be a huge benefit.
     Normally, you lease a war room. Wouldn’t it be great to have a mobile command center so you can get as close as you possibly can to the courthouse? A war room could normally be in a hotel maybe five blocks away. Now, I’m in the command center as close as we can get to the trial. I have a high speed copier , computer and office equipment. The work is right there.”
     Starting his business, Slyter has been an instant hit with obtaining much more work than he anticipated.  “When the attorney is going back in to trial, you can be filing whatever documents you need. It saves time and money in getting the documents filed.”
     Today, his growing business is steadily adding clients. His fees are all inclusive. There are no extra charges for copies, scanning or whatever else needs to be done. Up to 12 people can fit into in the mobile command center that is usually 40 feet long, 8 feet wide with the pop-up. Realistically, Sylter can comfortably hold six people on laptops. They can tie into the main server or operate off the network.
     “I hire senior level paralegals with heavy litigation experience. It’s more than a contractor/temp agency because we’re offering the benefit of state-of-the-art technology,” he says.
     Is he worried about competition? Not particularly. “I will out service them,” Slyter says confidently. “My service is where I will shine – on demand. The competition can under price us but in these situations, it’s all about service,” he says. 
     His entrepreneurial lifestyle has improved his family life. Married with two boys, 4 and 7, Slyter now gets more quality time with them. “After the boys go to bed, I can wake up at 2:00 am, get up and type it out. I’m there to pick up my boys in the afternoons. This whole scene has had such a positive effect on my family life that I’m kicking myself for not doing it sooner,” Slyter says.
|     As for the inevitable question of where do you want to be in five years? “I have to be working towards putting units into major markets, working with entrepreneurs and setting them up,” says Slyter. 
     For those thinking of making a transition to entrepreneur, Slyter has some words of wisdom. “Over plan,” he says. “Try to overfund it as much as possible with lots of reserves. Talk with a lot of your potential customers to see what the honest-to-goodness target market is. You need to get at least 5- 10 people you know who will tell you the truth. Ask for the business. Even before you start.”

For more information, visit www.litigationparalegals. net or send an e-mail to
kslyter@litigationparalegals.net.

 http://estrinlegaled.typepad.com/my_weblog/2011/04/successful-on-purpose-keith-slyter-and-his-mobile-war-room-command-center.html

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